21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar Review: Inflatable Collars for Cats

Let me start by saying that the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar was a godsend for me (and my cat, Laila, of course).  It was a dark time for us both when Laila had a bad reaction on her back to a rabies injection.  A node developed and she could not stop licking and scratching it.  It got so bad that it became infected.  I told her “Just stop licking and scratching and it’ll get better”.  She didn’t listen.




So unhappy!

 

So, now I had an itchy cat on antibiotics who I couldn’t reason with.  On the advice of our vet we put her in a small dog t-shirt so she couldn’t make physical contact with the wound but we needed an alternative to those awful plastic cone collars.  It was just so sad watching her stumble around the house.

My sadness (and Laila’s too) was lifted when I found the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar at PetSmart.  There were no inflatable collars for cats specifically so I purchased the x-small.  That was all Petsmart had in stock in the store and I got lucky.  She’s a dainty cat.  Whoever though of these inflatable cat collars is a genius!

 

Here’s what you need to know about the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar:

21st Century Inflatable Cat Collar

Durability

Unfortunately for Laila, she had to wear the inflatable cat collar for about 2 weeks.  We wanted to make sure everything was healed 100%.  The collar stayed on for the entire time.  She could not remove it. And believe me, she tried.  Since the initial illness, she has worn it twice more and it still looks as good as new.  Well, except for a few clumps of cat hair.

Ease of Use

These inflatable cat collars are easy to blow up.  You just need to pinch while you blow and pinch again to deflate.  They seal well so it actually stays blown up.  More importantly, the sturdy Velcro makes it easy to get on a squirming cat.  No buckles or snaps to fuss with.  Because they are inflatable, you can deflate them for easy storage and they bounce back like new if you need it again.  Just remember where you put it since hopefully you will not need it very often.

Fit

I bought the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar in x-small because that was my only option.  With the x-small on the tightest setting it stayed on fine but you could turn it around her neck so it got twisted pretty regularly.  You couldn’t tell though because she was also wearing a stylish “The Situation” t-shirt.  If your cat is smaller than Laila it might be a little loose.




The main thing about the fit is that it’s not too big for cats to carry around.  It limits what they can scratch and lick but minimizes the impact on other activities like eating and doing general cat stuff.  She was finally able to get comfortable with the inflatable collar on, unlike the hideous plastic one.

When we moved to Europe for 2 years we didn’t bring the inflatableWay too big! cat collar with us.  We had to order one on Amazon.  With limited options for shipping to France we ended up with one that is clearly for a dog.  It’s a “small” because we couldn’t find extra small.  Yes, it fit around her neck and stayed on but it was HUGE in comparison to the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar.  It weighed her down.  She just couldn’t settle and get comfortable like all cats love.  The opposite of our experience with the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar.  See the difference in the two pictures?

Cost

The  21st Century Inflatable Cat Collar in extra small is $19.99 at Petsmart.  If you are only using it once this is a bit pricey.  At least it’s reusable and I feel like we more than got our money’s worth.  I would pay that again to help ease the guilt in a heartbeat.

Usefulness

The SituationThe 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar worked great for Laila but it really depends on where your cat’s injury or problem area is.  Laila’s was on her back so these inflatable cat collars did the job and she was not able to lick the area or bend enough to scratch it.  Another time, she had a hot spot on her face above her eye that she was constantly licking and making worse.  The collars would limit access to the face as well as middle to upper stomach based on how they fit Laila.




If you’re trying to limit the access to their behind or back legs, depending on your cat’s dexterity, they may be able to reach there, even with the inflatable collar on.  You made need to go the plastic cone collar route in these cases.

I am so glad that we bought the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar in our time of need.  I wish I was able to order one from France but for financial reasons we need to make do with the LARGE “small” one we bought if she needs an inflatable collar again.  I recommend the purchase of the 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar in extra small for cats.

The 21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar gets 4 cat thumbs up – losing points only for the slightly high cost and the limit of usefulness depending on the injury area.

     

If your cat is sick or injured and is currently wearing the depressing plastic cone collar, get them a 21st Century Inflatable Cat Collar.  I won’t promise they’ll thank you but at least you won’t have to watch them blunder sadly around the house.



Amy

2 thoughts on “21st Century Inflatable Protective Pet Collar Review: Inflatable Collars for Cats

What a great idea and certainly a massive step forward in terms of pet care. They even look quite stylish, but your cat probably wont appreciate that aspect. In terms of your act adjusting to the collar, how long would you say that it normally takes for a cat to get used to. I previously had a cat who hated anything going over her head and the last thing any pet owner wants is to cause any further stress to their pets.

Reply

I think they’re stylish too and could be even better with some designs on them.  In my experience, my cat never gets used to it unfortunately.  She doesn’t know it but it would be much worse if she had to wear a plastic collar.  The main thing I think is that her whiskers are free (unlike the plastic collars) so she can sense where she is and doesn’t bump into anything.  She can also rest on it and sleep which is more difficult with the plastic collars.

Thanks for your comment!

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